Global Sources
EE Times-Asia
Stay in touch with EE Times Asia
?
EE Times-Asia > Sensors/MEMS
?
?
Sensors/MEMS??

Sensors with user-selectable gains

Posted: 05 Jul 2005 ?? ?Print Version ?Bookmark and Share

Keywords:national semiconductor? temperature sensor? sensor? lm94021? lm94022?

Sensor includes user-selectable gainsNational Semiconductor Corp. introduced what it touts as the industry's first 1.5V analog temperature sensors with user-selectable gains that increase thermal management performance in low-voltage systems.

The two new devicesLM94021 and LM94022have four user-selectable gains and monitor temperature from -50C to 150C. These temperature sensors' wide range of operation, flexibility and low-power performance make them well-suited for low-voltage, battery-powered systems such as cellular phones, PDAs, MP3 players and digital cameras, said the press release.

According to Andrew Jue, director of product marketing for National's Data Conversion Division, the company's thermal management innovations set the standard for temperature accuracy, performance over temperature and packaging. "The LM94021 and LM94022 continue this level of innovation and offer our customers a more efficient way to manage thermal performance."

The LM94021 and LM94022 are precision analog-output CMOS temperature sensors that operate from a supply voltage between 1.5V and 5.5V. They deliver an output voltage that is inversely proportional to measured temperature, for higher sensitivity at elevated temperatures. Users can select one of four programmable gain options: -5.5mV/C, -8.2mV/C, -10.9mV/C or -13.6mV/C/C. The LM94021 and LM94022 feature quiescent currents of 9?A and 5.4?A, respectively.

Housed in the SC70 package, the two new products are priced at 40 cents each in 1,000-unit quantities.




Article Comments - Sensors with user-selectable gains
Comments:??
*? You can enter [0] more charecters.
*Verify code:
?
?
Webinars

Seminars

Visit Asia Webinars to learn about the latest in technology and get practical design tips.

?
?
Back to Top