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High-capacity SSDs reduce enterprise costs

Posted: 22 Oct 2008 ?? ?Print Version ?Bookmark and Share

Keywords:soli-state drive? storage? memory?

Intel Corp. has started releasing its highest-performing solid-state drives (SSDs) such as the Intel X-25E Extreme SATA Solid-State Drive, designed for servers, workstations and storage systems.

Unlike mechanical drives, the SSDs have no moving parts and instead feature 50nm single-level cell (SLC) NAND flash memory technology. Systems employing these drives will not experience the performance bottlenecks related to common drives. By decreasing the total infrastructure, cooling and energy costs, SSDs can reduce the total cost of ownership for enterprise applications by more than five times.

The Intel X25-E increases server, workstation and storage system performance by 100 times over HDDs as measured in I/O per second (IOPS), today's key storage performance metric, according to Intel.

The product was intended for intense computing workloads, which benefit primarily from high random read and write performance, as used in IOPS. Major technical capacity specifications of the 32Gbyte Intel X-25E SATA SSD are 35,000IOPS (4Kbyte random read), 3,300IOPS (4Kbyte random write) and 75?s read latency. This performance, along with low-active power of 2.4W, gives up to 14,000IOPS/W.

The product also has up to 250Mbyte/s sequential read speeds and 170Mbyte/s sequential write speeds, all in a 2.5-inch form factor.

The 32Gbyte capacity drive is in production and priced at $695 for quantities up to 1,000. The 64Gbyte version is anticipated to sample in Q4 with production estimated for Q1 09.

- Ismini Scouras
eeProductCenter





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