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Micron ventures into data centre flash storage market

Posted: 18 Apr 2016 ?? ?Print Version ?Bookmark and Share

Keywords:data centre? SSD? SAN? flash-based storage devices? open source?

Micron Technology unveiled plans to step into the data centre storage fray with a new array of flash-based storage devices that reduce power consumption while speeding up the process of data retrieval over classic mechanical drives.

Companies are disaggregating storage from Storage Area Networks (SANs) and frame-based arrays, moving toward server-based storage as a solution because of today's changing computing landscape, which is largely driven by the influx of data being created, accessed and stored from the proliferation of mobile devices and cloud computing.

"Dstillery, a pioneer in big data intelligence, uses a combination of proprietary technology and human intuition to help brands and media companies achieve their marketing objectives. In a world where content consumption continues to grow rapidly, we ingest billions of data points on a daily basis," said Amit Gupta, vice president of infrastructure at Dstillery. "We perform 50 billion+ web transactions daily, most of which must be read from reliable storage media like Micron's PCIe SSDs."

"Wikibon research shows that game-changing productivity potential awaits enterprises that develop and deploy new data-rich applications. These systems will heavily depend on flash-enabled, shared-data environments with low latency and predictable performance," said David Floyer, CTO and co-founder, Wikibon.

Recently, Micron introduced two accelerated solutions to its data centre solid state drives (SSDs) portfolio. The NVME 9100 and 7100 PCIe SSDs compliments existing SATA and SAS drives, providing data centre customers with purpose-built storage products for implementing an agile, scale-out IT infrastructure.

These new drives extend Micron's rich portfolio of SATA and SAS SSDs that enable customers to extend and improve their legacy data centre infrastructure with proven flash products.

9100, 7100 NVME PCIe SSDs

The Micron 9100 NVMe PCIe SSD brings nonvolatile memory as close as possible to the processor, maximizing data speeds in the most demanding environments. The fast performance of a single Micron 9100 NVMe SSD enables customers to deliver up to 10 times faster business results compared to a single data centre SATA SSD.

Achieving 3.2TB of storage in both a HHHL & a 2.5in U.2 form factor, the Micron 9100 SSD is purpose built to efficiently process business data. The U.2 form factor of Micron's 9100 SSD allows front-bay access to the server, delivering a recognisable form, fit and function that IT knows.

The Micron 7100 NVMe PCIe SSD, on the other hand, promises to bring higher performance and lower TCO to meet growing and changing enterprise needs. Whether it's the slim 7mm U.2 (2.5in) hotpluggable form factor or the tiny M.2, the 7100 allows dense designs that pack a punch. It uses half as many watts as a standard high-performance NVMe drive but provides low latencies unachievable by SATA SSDs.

S600DC SAS SSDs

Compared to 15K HDDs, Micron's S600DC SAS Series provides customers with greater capacity, better performance and higher endurance at a much more affordable price point.

The S600DC SSD achieves 4TB of storage in a 2.5in form factormore than double the capacity 10K 2.5in HDDs and 4x the capacity of 15K HDDs. Micron's S600DC SSD portfolio offers ultra-fast 12Gb/s SAS dual port bandwidth, delivering dramatic improvements in storage and server performance. The S610DC and S630DC provide up to 450x the performance of a single 15K RPM SAS HDD, while maintaining an equal or less dollar per gigabyte.


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