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Maxim amp forms part of SFP module solution

Posted: 20 Jul 2004 ?? ?Print Version ?Bookmark and Share

Keywords:maxX3746? maxim integrated products? limiting amplifier? max3744? transimpedance amplifier?

The MAX3746 from Maxim Integrated Products is a 3.3V, low-power, multirate limiting amplifier with a programmable loss-of-signal indicator.

The company's MAX3744 transimpedance amplifier (TIA), MAX3746 limiting amplifier and the MAX3735A/MAX3740A laser drivers form a 3-chip solution for SFP digital diagnostic modules.

Consuming 66mW of power, the MAX3746 is designed for 622Mbps to 3.2Gbps SFF-8472-compatible receiver modules, as well as SFP-based DWDM modules. When dc-coupled with the MAX3744, the new limiting amplifier can provide a receive-power-monitoring signal (RSSI) for digital diagnostic applications. According to Maxim, this allows the implementation of digital diagnostics while allowing the TIA to be packaged in a low-cost, 4-pin TO-46 header.

Signal-detect function

The MAX3746 is available in a 3-by-3mm, 16-pin QFN package, and is pin-compatible to the MAX3748A. Operating from a single 3.3V supply, the device has a better than 2mV input sensitivity and 150?V root-mean-square input-referred noise. It has a programmable signal-detect function that can be set to different assert and deassert levels while maintaining a 2dB of hysterisis, and features an 8.5ps deterministic jitter and 3ps root-mean-square of random jitter. It can accept input voltages from 2mV to 1,200mV and provides an 800mV output (typ).

The MAX3746 operates over the extended temperature range, with prices starting at $4.75 (1,000-up, FOB USA). An evaluation kit is available to speed designs.





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