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AMD builds energy-efficient processors at 65nm

Posted: 07 Dec 2006 ?? ?Print Version ?Bookmark and Share

Keywords:AMD? dual-core processor? Athlon? 65nm? desktop processor?

AMD Athlon 64 X2 built at 65nm

AMD has launched the next-generation of energy-efficient computing with the immediate availability of Athlon 64 X2 dual-core desktop processors built on the 65nm process technology.

According to the company, the move to 65nm process technology enables it to produce more processors on a 300mm wafer, for increased production capacity, while continuing to aggressively scale performance and reduce power consumption. AMD processors built with 65nm line-widths are designed to deliver quality performance when running multiple applications, as well as enable small form factor PCs that complement both home and office environments. By mid-2007, AMD expects to be fully converted to 65nm production at its Fab 36.

"Customers continue to demand solutions that focus on low-power consumption and quieter operation," said Bob Brewer, corporate VP of AMD's desktop division. "AMD is responding by increasing manufacturing efficiency to deliver on the next generation of energy-efficient desktop processors, enabling OEMS to innovate using highly reliable AMD64 processors and without compromising performance."

Higher output volumes
AMD's 65nm silicon-on-insulator (SOI) is built on the company's 90nm high-performance, low-power SOI technology. The move to 65nm allows for reductions in line widths, which enable AMD to produce more processors on a 300mm wafer. As a result, AMD can deliver high output volumes and enhanced products for its customers.

Energy-efficient AMD Athlon 64 X2 dual-core processors can deliver improved performance-per-watt and reduced power consumption. AMD said it will continue within the 65nm generation to enhance both AMD64 processors and process technology to offer even more energy-efficient processors. The next generation of energy-efficient processors complement the company's Cool'n'Quiet technology, allowing a system to match processor utilization to the performance actually required.

AMD enables technologies designed for outstanding mainstream PC experiences that result in superior graphics performance, enhanced video quality and minimal idle power draw. Through relationships with leading OEMs and system builders, as well as chipset, graphics and motherboard vendors, AMD provides an open platform approach that allows customers to select stable technologies and build differentiated and innovative solutions.

Socket AM2- compatible processors are designed to enhance the AMD64 architecture, enabling next-generation platform innovations such as AMD-Virtualization technology and high-performance, unbuffered DDR2 memory. Additionally, the use of socket AM2 streamlines the work for motherboard manufacturers, while reducing costs through economies of scale, which can result in better products at lower prices.

Vista-ready
AMD64 processors are ready and capable to provide users with the foundation needed to experience the power of Windows Vista.

"Microsoft and AMD have been working together to ensure customers get the quality, security and computing experience they deserve and expect using the upcoming Windows Vista operating system," said Mike Sievert, corporate VP, Windows, Microsoft. "We look forward to processor advances in energy efficiency and performance made possible with AMD's transition to 65nm technology, and expect that they will continue to enhance the customers' experience using Windows Vista."

Pricing for the 65nm AMD Athlon 64 dual-core processors 5000+, 4800+, 4400+ and 4000+ are $301, $271, $214 and $169, respectively in 1,000 units PIB. Pricing details available at AMD.




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