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ARM processor easily interfaces with FPGAs

Posted: 07 Mar 2007 ?? ?Print Version ?Bookmark and Share

Keywords:processor? ARM core? FPGA? Faraday? CPU?

Faraday Technology Corp. has announced the FPGACompanion (FC) CPU chip, targeted at system companies who need a full-featured ARM CPU chip that can easily be interfaced to various FPGA devices.

ARM core
With an embedded ARM core and on-chip peripheral functions in the FC device, ASIC customers can use FC in system-level SoC design verification together with customer logic implemented on FPGA devices. Faraday's FC has been sampled at several customer sites, with general availability starting immediately.

ARM is the most pervasive non-PC processor architecture for SoC implementations. However, lacking a device that can easily interface to FPGAs, many SoC-based designs start with either x86 -, PowerPC- or MIPS-based architectures, and eventually convert to ARM-based SoCs later, requiring considerable software porting efforts. A validation platform and initial sampling vehicle is needed by SoC designers to perform system-level validation prior to SoC commitment. Faraday's FC is tailored to fulfill these specific needs. Customers can use FC to address fast time-to-market needs at the same time mitigate system risks with the availability of an early development and production platform.

Highly integrated
The FPGACompanion is a highly integrated silicon-proven device that integrates a 190MHz ARM processor and peripherals, with a pre-integrated AHB bus header for direct connectivity to popular FPGA devices. The FC is architecturally compatible with Faraday's existing Peripheral Composer-1 (PC-1) structured ASIC platform.




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