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Morphing ICs adapt to applications

Posted: 23 Nov 2010 ?? ?Print Version ?Bookmark and Share

Keywords:chaos? logic gates? silicon? chaogates?

A team of researchers at the University of Arizona has found an alternative to conventional logic gates, demonstrated them in silicon, and dubbed them "chaogates."

In a study descibed in the journal Chaos, published by the American Institute of Physics, the researchers used chaotic patterns to encode and manipulate inputs to produce a desired output. They selected desired patterns from the infinite variety offered by a chaotic system. A subset of these patterns was then used to map the system inputs (initial conditions) to their desired outputs. They found that this process provides a way to design computing devices with the capacity to reconfigure into a range of logic gates. The resulting morphing gates are chaogates.

"Chaogates are the building block of new, chaos-based computer systems that exploit the enormous pattern formation properties of chaotic systems for computation," says William Ditto, an inventor of chaos-based computing systems and director of the School of Biological Health Systems Engineering at Arizona State University. "Imagine a computer that can change its own internal behavior to create a billion custom chips a second based on what the user is doing that secondone that can reconfigure itself to be the fastest computer for that moment, for your purpose."

Ditto and colleagues have formed a startup semiconductor company, ChaoLogix, to develop the technology. Commercial prototypes are underway.

According to Ditto, chaogates could potentially go into every type of consumer electronic device, with added advantages for custom, morphable gaming chips and secure computer chips that will be more immune to hacking of information at the hardware level than conventional computer chips.

The ICs using chaogates can be manufactured using the same fabrication, assembly and test facilities as those already in use today. They can incorporate standard logic, memory and chaogates on the same device.

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