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Nanowires boost quantum-dot PV system efficiency

Posted: 27 Mar 2013 ?? ?Print Version ?Bookmark and Share

Keywords:quantum-dot PV? zinc oxide nanowire? PV?

A team of researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has embedded particles called quantum dots within a forest of nanowires that promise to provide a significant boost for photovoltaic (PV) cells. Although the concept has been present for some time, up until now, no such devices have yet achieved sufficiently high efficiency in converting sunlight to power.

PVs based on tiny colloidal quantum dots have several potential advantages over other approaches to making solar cells: They can be manufactured in a room-temperature process, saving energy and avoiding complications associated with high-temperature processing of silicon and other PV materials. They can be made from abundant, inexpensive materials that do not require extensive purification, as silicon does. And they can be applied to a variety of inexpensive and even flexible substrate materials, such as lightweight plastics.

But there's a trade-off in designing such devices, because of two contradictory needs for an effective PV: A solar cell's absorbing layer needs to be thin to allow charges to pass readily from the sites where solar energy is absorbed to the wires that carry current awaybut it also needs to be thick enough to absorb light efficiently. Improved performance in one of these areas tends to worsen the other, says Joel Jean, a doctoral student in MIT's Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).

"You want a thick film to absorb the light, and you want it thin to get the charges out," he said. "So there's a huge discrepancy."

That's where the addition of zinc oxide nanowires can play a useful role. The nanowires are conductive enough to extract charges easily, but long enough to provide the depth needed for light absorption, Jean indicated. Using a bottom-up growth process to grow these nanowires and infiltrating them with lead-sulfide quantum dots produces a 50 per cent boost in the current generated by the solar cell, and a 35 per cent increase in overall efficiency. The process produces a vertical array of these nanowires, which are transparent to visible light, interspersed with quantum dots.

"If you shine light along the length of the nanowires, you get the advantage of depth," he noted. But also, "you decouple light absorption and charge carrier extraction, since the electrons can hop sideways onto a nearby nanowire and be collected."

One advantage of quantum dot-based PVs is that they can be tuned to absorb light over a much wider range of wavelengths than conventional devices, Jean stated. This is an early demonstration of a principle that, through further optimisation and improved physical understanding, might lead to practical, inexpensive new kinds of photovoltaic devices.

Already, the test devices have produced efficiencies of almost five per cent, among the highest ever reported for a quantum-dot PV based on zinc oxide, he continued. With further development, Jean said, it may be possible to improve the devices' overall efficiency beyond 10 per cent, which is widely accepted as the minimum efficiency for a commercially viable solar cell. Further research will, among other things, explore using longer nanowires to make thicker films, and also work on better controlling the spacing of the nanowires to improve the infiltration of quantum dots between them.

The team, which also included postdoc Sehoon Chang and graduate students Patrick Brown, Jayce Cheng and Paul Rekemeyer, was supported by the National Science Foundation; the MIT Centre for Materials Science and Engineering; the Samsung Group; the MIT/Masdar Institute Cooperative Program; the MIT Energy Initiative; the Hertz Foundation; and the Agency for Science, Technology and Research of Singapore.





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